Updated: 07/10/16 : 06:11:56
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Letters to the Editor - Updated

Hi Editor,

It's a shame nobody had the ball's to address the UK public in the way that Robert De Niro did recently in the run up to the American presidency election.
 
Listening to the way he described Trump as 'a fool and bozo a con' the very words that summed up the Brexit three Boris, Farage and Gove who led the UK to the mess that's going to haunt the UK for sometime to come.

De Niro is trying to prevent a man made disaster in the US by speaking frankly and to the point, it's just a shame it's come to late for the British public.

With sterling looming treacherously low the nightmare of Brexit is now here to stay.

Noel Sainsbury
North London
 
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Dear Editor,


I am a 40 year old woman who has been fortunate enough to have lived and worked all over the world. I was born in Dublin and have lived in Ireland for most of my life. I graduated in aeronautical engineering and from my mid twenties onwards have enjoyed a successful career.

However, life being life things changed dramatically for me some years ago. I fell ill and after three years of recovery I found myself having to start life all over again. I needed a new home and a new career.

Against all odds I have managed to lay the foundations and I am on my way. I am currently in my second year studying accounting in Sligo and things have been going well. I bought an old car which I depended on to get me from A to B.

This is where my issue begins. Unfortunately my car has come to the end of it's useful life and has been declared non road worthy.

In Ireland in 2016 you would think that living less than twenty miles away from a main Irish city without owning a car wouldn't be an issue. You would think that I would be able to catch a train, a bus or even a coach (albeit expensive) to travel such a short distance.

Alas, none of these options are available to me until 10am any morning. If I were to take the only transport available (a train costing 16 euro return) from Ballymote to Sligo I would arrive at college for 11.05am. Two and a half hours late every day.

I have now resorted to hitch hiking because nobody has answered my car sharing requests yet. After writing to the local TDs I was told that the issue has been raised with Iarnrod Eireann and the government.

Apparently there is a train available which is left unused at the Sligo terminal. It could be used to travel from Longford to Sligo every morning yet nothing has been done to push this option. I am appalled that our taxes which pay for public services have not covered the Ballymote area.

There are places in the world with no roads that have better public transport. As the winter draws in I am concerned for my well being and anyone else who has the same issue. Travelling to Dublin is absolutely no problem but if anyone wants to go the opposite direction it is near to impossible without a car.

I simply cannot believe this issue exists in 2016 less than 20 miles outside a main Irish city. I am appealing to you as my most respected local newspaper to bring this issue to the attention of the Irish tax payer.

Where are our taxes going when the fundamental resources are simply not being fulfilled?

Yours faithfully,

Deborah, current hitch hiker 

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Dear Editor,


When did religion become a dirty word? All of us, pro-life or pro-choice come to our position as a result of our value or belief system. Yes, many pro-life people have come to their viewpoint on abortion partially based on their faith.  However, does this somehow make their position less valid or relevant?  How is this any different than someone who is pro-choice basing their stance on their own beliefs or value systems.
 
Does not our belief system, faith, or values form an essential role in a person’s decision making process; whether it is a decision made in the workplace, in relationships, rearing children, our treatment of the environment and our views and relationship with society in general.  I think most would agree that this is the case regardless of a person’s religion or lack of. What are we really saying here, that a secular viewpoint is the only acceptable one? Is this the face of democracy now in Ireland?
 
More and more in the debate regarding repealing the 8th amendment, we are seeing those campaigning to repeal, dismissing the other argument with the “religion label”, as a legitimate reason to dismiss all pro-life reasoning, and thereby render the points mute. What a lazy yet increasingly common tactic.

Those in the prolife movement come from all walks of life, faith and none. And surely during this debate, all voices should be heard. At what point did the label of “faith” or “religion” become a tool to totally dismiss a pro-life viewpoint? Surely we can do better than this as the debate progresses? Or perhaps this is a ploy to avoid debating and exploring the real issues and concerns that those who are pro-life have regarding removing the 8th amendment from our constitution.

We only have to look at the last week for a perfect example of intolerance for those of faith speaking out on the issue. Last weekend, the Catholic Primate of Ireland, Archbishop Eamon Martin caused a stir when he spoke on the abortion issue.  While celebrities that support repeal of the 8th, are lauded and admired and get front page headlines with no critique; when the leader of the catholic church in Ireland speaks out, there is out cry.  Politicians, campaigners and journalists, clambering to criticize the Archbishop and to point out that he is only one voice, or in fact completely irrelevant in the debate. 

Surely we must recognise that he is doing his job, leading his flock, outlining the church’s teachings on the matter. 84% of the country still identifies themselves as Catholics, therefore surely the Archbishops comments carry some weight and relevance. Perhaps this is in fact the problem, no high profile prolife voices please, and certainly none that could possible carry any influence. It would seem that only pro-choice celebrities’ views count.  Meanwhile the Archbishop and the church can baptize, marry and bury us, but on all else remain silent!

Sile

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