Updated: 24/10/17 : 08:35:08
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World :: Top Russian radio presenter in coma following stabbing

One of Russia's top radio presenters has had surgery after being stabbed in the neck by a man who broke into her newsroom at broadcaster Ekho Moskvy.

Tatyana Felgengauer is in a medically-induced coma in a Moscow hospital but her life is not said to be in danger.

A male suspect is under arrest. His motive is not clear, though police say it appears to be a personal grudge.

Ekho Moskvy, an independent station, often broadcasts views critical of the Kremlin.

The knifeman reportedly sprayed a gas into the face of a security guard as he broke in.

According to Ekho Moskvy, the alleged attacker's name is Boris Grits. It describes the attacker as an Israeli, citing "informed sources".

Russian police described him as a 48-year-old foreigner. "Initial findings show that personal dislike was the motivation," police told Interfax news agency.

The Moscow police have released a video clip of the suspect under arrest, in which he claims that Felgengauer had "sexually harassed me through telepathy".

A blog apparently published by Boris Grits also contains posts vilifying Felgengauer.

A Russian state TV channel recently accused Ekho Moskvy ("Moscow Echo" in English) of working with the West to produce anti-Russian propaganda, the BBC's Sarah Rainsford reports from Moscow.

Just last month, another of its journalists, Yulia Latynina, left the country after she was sprayed with faeces and her car was set on fire.

Staff at the radio station say the man did not shout anything before he stabbed Tatyana Felgengauer on the building's 14th floor.

She is deputy chief editor at Ekho Moskvy and has worked there for more than 10 years. She is the daughter of Pavel Felgengauer, a prominent journalist with military expertise.

A photo of the suspect was published by the radio station's website editor, Vitaly Ruvinsky, on Facebook.

One of the broadcaster's security guards was injured as the knifeman was being overpowered.

Most Russians rely on TV for their news and the main channels are either directly state-controlled or run by companies with close links to the Kremlin.

There have been many attacks on investigative reporters and other journalists who have challenged Russia's powerful vested interests.