Updated: 09/01/18 : 05:53:39
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Wild Atlantic Way tourists getting lost seeking Enniscrone or Inishcrone

It's not quite a tale of two cities but a tale of two names. Is it Enniscrone or Inishcrone?

Back in the mid-1990s official road signs began appearing around the Co Sligo town directing and welcoming people to Inishcrone.

It didn't bother locals too much in the beginning but now it's become a big problem.

Publican Ann Gilroy says they've seen an increase in visitors due to the Wild Atlantic Way but lots of them are getting lost.

They can't find the town because they are looking for Enniscrone, the name all the locals use, but the signs all say Inishcrone and this is a problem particularly for foreign visitors.

The problem has been compounded by social media and sat navs because many only recognise Inishcrone.
















Michael Jacob of the local golf club says someone trying to find Enniscrone Golf Links could be sent to a place in Ohio or a B&B in Co Meath.

He and others are concerned that with the increasing use of the name Inishcrone due to the internet, the history and heritage of Enniscrone will be lost.

Muredach Tuffy of the local placenames committee has researched the history of the name and believes that Enniscrone was the predominant name from the 1700s onwards with only the occasional use of Inishcrone.

He found old maps going back centuries in the famous Jackie Clarke Collection in Ballina which he says, combined with old school and church records in the town, backs up the case that the town should be called Enniscrone.

All the evidence supporting its call to change the official name from Inishcrone to Enniscrone has been presented by the committee to Sligo County Council.


It's now asking the council to hold a plebiscite to let local people have their say and, if it goes ahead, the committee believes a majority would vote for the name Enniscrone, the one they've all grown up with.

RTÉ